Bridging psychological type and depth psychology

Editors: Carol Shumate, Mark Hunziker, Jenny Soper, Amy Evers, Christopher Ross, and Olivia Ireland (Art Editor)

Next Issue: January

Posts Tagged ‘Extraversion’

So Texas Walks Into a Bar …

With his unique thundering velvet hand approach, a Texan rarely says, “Shut up!” or “Don’t do that!” Instead, we hear, “Hush,” or “That would be ill-advised,” with a long drawl and a grin. The result is effective and charming, binding the man to his community. He easily compensates in robust, creative, and powerful ways to ensure full balance in his personality expression.

Continue Reading...












Ambiversion: Ideal or Myth?

“Ambiversion”—the equal development of extraversion and introversion in an individual—has become a popular notion of late but it has led to some misinterpretations of Jung’s typology—specifically, to an idealization of this in-between state …

Continue Reading...












The Archetypal Leader

I concluded that I simply did not have the requisite attributes to lead. I now realize that a number of other members of my section were also introverted, and that the majority of people in the unit, Green Berets or otherwise, were not necessarily extraverted; but the organization itself wore a collective persona that was extraverted in appearance.

Continue Reading...












Type and Exceptional Learners

Delivering education that gets today’s students ready for the modern world must incorporate flexibility, diversification, and individualization. Students have moved past the structure of traditional classrooms. They have different problems, different gifts, and dramatically different brains. Educators need to refocus their efforts on teaching individuals.

Continue Reading...












Dreaming The Dream On

In a dream she showed up as twins. One who was quiet and could play by herself (like her father, Ti) and the other who was very precocious as she hung upside down from a tree (like her mother, Te), reflecting the inherent nature of the Opposing Personality. From the outset of our work her battle seemed to reflect inferiority about not being an extravert.

Continue Reading...












Q: How Do You Learn About Type?

Which do you trust more to give you reliable information about type: observation or introspection? And what is your type preference? Of course, all type users rely upon both the observation of others and internal self-reflection to expand and confirm their understanding of personality type. But it seems as though we differ in which we prefer.

Continue Reading...












Getting Beyond ‘Inner’ and ‘Outer’

Introverted thinking is more concerned with satisfying a subtle, personally perceived standard of truth—like Barack Obama in his first debate with Mitt Romney. People saw Obama hesitating and looking away from his opponent. I read that as him double-checking to make sure that what he was about to say would meet a benchmark of critical thinking.

Continue Reading...












Anxiety and the Energy Attitude

I went back to the thing that seemed to make no sense. I asked Matt why he thought he became anxious coming home from work but did not experience this fear on his way into work? I had spent the hour prior to my session with Matt going through notes of other therapies with other ENTJs, but nothing in this other work had seemed particularly germane.

Continue Reading...












Q: Are Type Preferences Balanced?

In Douglass Wilde’s article about his method of calculating the function-attitudes from MBTI® scores (right), he adds his voice to the persistent minority who challenge the conventional wisdom about the sequence of function-attitude preferences. … By downloading the Wilde Worksheet for Computing Function-Attitudes, you can test these formulations for yourself.

Continue Reading...












Using Type for Healthy Habits

Type enthusiasts may wonder whether we can purposely apply our personality preferences—which are comfortable ‘tools’ to make habit change a little easier. Speaking as a lifestyle medicine physician, as well as a type enthusiast for the past two decades, I believe we can. . . . Type affects what motivates us and how we learn new skills . . .

Continue Reading...












3000 Years of Type Dis-Integration

The schizoid nature of western civilization gives credence to our emphasis on the necessity of using all of the functions (S, N, T, F), in both attitudes of Introversion (I) and Extraversion (E) . . . . When civilizations emphasize only one part of psychological type, they diminish themselves and set themselves up to see the world through distorted lenses.

Continue Reading...












Type, Psychoanalysis & Meditation

. . . how do we get a “spaciousness” in our own responses so that we can experience our feelings, our thoughts, our motivations without acting on them directly—but without denying them either. This is not a matter of suppressing, dissociating, trying to override one’s negative experience; it’s not a matter of controlling; it’s not a matter of pushing anything aside. It’s a matter of being able to watch what is going on in our own experience . . .

Continue Reading...